爱要有你才完美:温情卷(txt+pdf+epub+mobi电子书下载)

作者:《新东方英语》编辑部

出版社:北京语言大学出版社

格式: AZW3, DOCX, EPUB, MOBI, PDF, TXT

爱要有你才完美:温情卷

爱要有你才完美:温情卷试读:

你是我的守护天使

A Child's Angel

Once upon a time there was a child ready to be born. One day the little child asked God, "They tell me you are sending me to earth tomorrow, but how am I going to live there being so small and helpless?"

God answered him, "Among the many angels, I have chosen one for you. She will be waiting for you and will take care of you."

"But tell me what I am going to do," asked the child, "here in Heaven, I don't do anything else but sing and smile, which is enough for me to be happy."

"Your angel will sing for you and will also smile for you every day. And you will feel your angel's love and be happy." God reassured him.

"And how am I going to be able to understand when people talk to me, if I don't know the language that men talk?"

"Your angel will tell you the most beautiful and sweet words you will ever hear, and with much patience and care, your angel will teach you how to speak."

"And what am I going to do when I want to talk to you, Lord?"

"Your angel will place your hands together and will teach you how to pray."

"I've heard that on earth there are bad men. Who will protect me?"

"Your angel will defend you even if it means risking its life."

At that moment there was much peace in Heaven, but voices from earth could already be heard, and the child in a hurry asked softly, "Oh God, if I am about to leave now, please tell me my angel's name."

"You will call your angel Mother."(Author Unknown)

孩子的守护天使

从前,一个孩子就要诞生到人世。一天,这个小孩问上帝:“他们告诉我,你明天就要把我送到人间去,但我这么小,这么无助,到了那儿我要怎么生活啊?”

上帝回答他说:“天堂里有很多天使,我挑选了一个给你。她会在那里一直等着你、照顾你。”“但是在天堂里,我每天除了歌唱和欢笑,其他什么事也不做,因为这样我就非常快乐了,”孩子问,“请你告诉我,到了人间我该做些什么呢?”“你的天使会每天为你歌唱,还会每天对你微笑。你会感觉到她对你的爱,那样你就会快乐了。”上帝安慰他说。“那要是人们对我说话,我怎么才能听懂呢?我不懂人类的语言啊。”“你的天使会对你说一些你所听过的最美丽、最亲切的话语,而且她会非常耐心仔细地教你说话。”“可是主啊,当我想和您说话时,我该怎么办呢?”“你的天使会把你的双手合在一起,教你如何祷告。”“我听说人间有恶人,谁来保护我呢?”“你的天使会保护你,即使这意味着牺牲她自己的生命。”

在那一刻,天堂里一片静谧,但来自人间的声音已依稀可闻,孩子赶紧轻声问上帝:“上帝啊,如果我现在就要离开,请告诉我这位天使的名字吧。”“你可以叫她妈妈。”(译 / 张玲)

The Mother

The most beautiful word on the lips of mankind is the word "Mother", and the most beautiful call is the call of "My mother". It is a word full of hope and love, a sweet and kind word coming from the depths of the heart. The mother is everything—she is our consolation in sorrow, our hope in misery, and our strength in weakness. She is the source of love, mercy, sympathy, and forgiveness. He who loses his mother loses a pure soul who blesses and guards him constantly.

Everything in nature bespeaksthe mother. The sun is the mother of earth and gives it its nourishment of heat; it never leaves the universe at night until it has put the earth to sleep to the song of the sea and the hymnof birds and brooks. And this earth is the mother of trees and flowers. It produces them, nurses them, and weansthem. The trees and flowers become kind mothers of their great fruits and seeds. And the mother, the prototypeof all existence, is the eternal spirit, full of beauty and love.(By Kahlil Gibran)

母亲

人类嘴边最美丽的词语莫过于“母亲”,而最动听的呼唤莫过于一声“我的母亲”。“母亲”这个词满载着希望和爱,发自人们的内心深处,甜蜜而又亲切。母亲就是一切——她是我们悲伤时的安慰,痛苦时的希望,脆弱时的力量。她是爱、仁慈、同情和宽恕的源泉。谁失去了母亲,就失去了始终如一地庇佑与呵护他的纯洁灵魂。

自然界的万物都是母亲中的一员。太阳是大地的母亲,她用自己的热量滋养着大地;夜晚,太阳母亲会哄大地入睡,让她在海洋的吟唱以及鸟儿与溪流的欢歌中进入梦乡后才会离去。大地是树木和花朵的母亲,她孕育了她们,滋养着她们,又让她们离开自己的怀抱独自成长。树木和花朵又成为丰硕果实和饱满种子的慈母。而母亲,那宇宙万物的原型啊,就是一种充满美丽与爱的永恒精神。( 译 / 赵越)

Five-finger Discount

The Belfast, Maine of my youth was not the coastal tourist village that it is today. At the time, Belfast was still a blue-collar town. McDonald's hadn't yet moved into town. Before the supermarket existed, Cottle's, a food market where my dad worked, was the only place where my mother could do her once-a-week shopping. Because we lived a few miles from Belfast, we'd usually combine the grocery trip with a visit to see my grandmother. Of course, Grammy always had cookies ready for the grandkids.

On one particular shopping day at Cottle's, I stood behind my mother as she was unloading the grocery cart and checking her items outat the register. The candy displays on either side of me were full of Life Savers, Clark Bars, Tootsie Rolls, Sugar Babies—you name it!

"Can I get some candy?" I asked.

My mother rarely veeredfrom her list so I wasn't surprised with her response. "No."

This much I knew for certain. "No" always meant "No". There was no sense in me asking a second time. But I really, really wanted that candy!

I reached for a Sugar Baby package. My mother didn't notice. So I figured she probably wouldn't notice if I ever so coylyput them into my pocket. We continued checking out and walked with the bag boy to the car where he loaded the bags into the car's trunk. No one noticed my action—not my mother, not the cashier, not the bag boy—no one! I did it! Wow! My very first shopliftingexperience! A five-finger discount! How exciting! How easy! How rewarding! Got my candy and didn't need one penny to get it!

I sat in the back seat as my mother drove across the bridge to where my grandmother lived. Slowly, so as not to make any unnecessary noise, I opened my prize and carefully slippeda Sugar Baby into my mouth. No one piece of candy ever tasted so good! Mom might have said, "No," but I'd said, "Yes," and look who'd won!

When we pulled into my grandmother's driveway, I knew I was in the clear. Miles and minutes separated me from Cottle's. As I prepared to open my car door, I confidently slipped a few more Sugar Babies into my mouth. They would tide me overuntil I got to Grammy's cookie jar inside.

Big mistake. "Keith, what have you got in your mouth?" I looked up at the rearview mirrorand could see the reflection of my mother's eyes staring intentlyback at me. "I asked you a question! What have you got in your mouth?"

Though I'd recently become skilled in the art of shoplifting, I hadn't quite mastered the art of giving false testimony. "Uhhh ... just some Sugar Babies."

"Sugar Babies? Where did you get the money to buy them?" Why was she asking such a foolish question? She knew I hadn't purchased them. It was no big deal. Nobody even saw me take them. It was one little package of Sugar Babies. Let's just go into Grammy's! "I ... uh ... didn't really buy them."

"That's what I thought!" And then, rather than just going into Grammy's house and giving me a good scolding, she began backing out of my grandmother's driveway.

As she drove away from my grandmother's house and then back across the bridge, I knew exactly where we were headed. To Cottle's! This was so stupid! We're talking twenty-five cents here! A return trip all the wayback there was a ridiculous waste of gas and time, if you asked me. Why was she turning this into such an emotional drama? What was she trying to prove?

I didn't have long to find out.

My mother pulled into Cottle's parking lot, cast one more glare my way, and marched me into the store. She proceeded to hunt downMr. Proulx, the store manager! Why would she want to bother an important man like Mr. Proulx about me needing to pay for some candy that any cashier could more easily just take care of?

Once she located him and got his full attention, she said, in a voice that could be heard from three aisles away, "Tell Mr. Proulx what you did!"

I knew Mr. Proulx. I liked Mr. Proulx. But on this day Mr. Proulx was taking all of his cuesfrom my mother. There was no room for doubt. I was on trial and Mr. Proulx was judge and jury! Through tears, I admitted what I had done and apologized. My mother put a quarter in my hand to give to him. Mr. Proulx listened and accepted my apology along with the twenty-five cents. He then issued a sternwarning, explaining what the consequences would be if there was ever a repeat performance. Snuffling, embarrassed, ashamed, I totally understood the significance of my actions and what they might lead to if not nipped in the bud: Sugar Babies today, grand theft auto tomorrow.

To this day, often while in a checkout lane near a candy rack, I think back to the lesson I learned from my mother. Thanks, Mom, for keeping me from a life of crime.(By Keith Smith)

顺手牵“糖”

我小的时候,缅因州的贝尔法斯特还不是如今这样的海滨旅游小镇。那个时候,贝尔法斯特还是一座蓝领小镇,麦当劳都还没有进驻。在超市出现前,爸爸工作的科特尔食品商场成了妈妈每周一次购物唯一可去的地方。由于我们住得离贝尔法斯特有几英里远,所以我们常常在购物的时候顺便去看望外婆。当然啦,外婆总是为我们这些孩子准备好饼干吃。

有一天去科特尔商场购物时,妈妈在收银台前从购物车里拿出所买的货品逐项结账,我站在她身后。在我两旁的货架上摆满了各式各样的糖果——Life Saver薄荷糖、Clark Bar牛轧糖、Tootsie Roll咀嚼糖、Sugar Baby牛奶焦饴糖——各种品牌,应有尽有!“能给我买点儿糖吗?”我问妈妈。

妈妈的注意力几乎没从清单上移开,因此她回答“不行”的时候我并不意外。

对此我十分肯定。“不行”就意味着“不行”。我再问第二遍毫无意义。但是我真的真的很想吃糖!

我把手伸向一包Sugar Baby糖,妈妈并未注意到。因此我想,如果我假装害羞然后把它们塞进衣服口袋里,妈妈很可能不会发现。我们继续结账,然后随着打包服务员一起走到车前,服务员把购物袋放进后备厢。谁也没有发现我的偷窃行为——无论是我妈妈、收银员还是打包服务员——没有任何人发现!我成功了!哇!我平生第一次体验商店行窃!一次顺手牵羊!多么令人激动!多么轻而易举!多么有收获!我分文未花就得到了这些糖!

妈妈开车通过一座桥,向外婆家驶去,我坐在车后座上。为了避免发出不必要的声音,我慢慢地打开自己的战利品,然后小心翼翼地把一块Sugar Baby糖偷偷塞进了嘴里。再没有比这更好吃的糖啦!妈妈或许说过“不行”,但是我却说“行”,看看最终是谁赢了!

当我们驶入外婆家的车道时,我以为我安全了——距离上和时间上我都远离了科特尔商场。我一边准备打开车门,一边安心地又塞了几块Sugar Baby糖到嘴里。它们甜美的味道会一直伴随我进入外婆家直到我拿起饼干罐。

这样做真是大错特错!“基思,你嘴里在吃什么东西?”我抬头看向后视镜,发现妈妈正从镜子里目不转睛地盯着我。“我问你呢!你嘴里在吃什么东西?”

虽然我刚刚熟练掌握了入店行窃术,但我却尚不精于提供假证词。“呃……就是一些Sugar Baby糖。”“Sugar Baby糖?你哪来的钱买糖?”妈妈怎么会问我这样一个愚蠢的问题?她知道我根本就没买过。没什么大不了的,根本就没人看见我拿糖了。不就是一小袋Sugar Baby糖嘛。赶紧进外婆家吧!“我……呃……其实我并没买。”“果然不出我所料!”接着,妈妈既没有进外婆家,也没有狠狠批评我,而是把车倒出了外婆家的车道。

等妈妈将车驶离了外婆家然后再次穿过那座桥的时候,我清楚地知道我们将前往何处。去科特尔商场!真是太傻了!不过是一包25美分的糖而已!如果你问我,我会说:开车大老远原路返回真够可笑的,既费油又费时。为什么妈妈要小题大做呢?她想要证明什么呢?

没过多久我就找到了答案。

妈妈把车停入科特尔商场的停车场,又瞪了我一眼,带着我走进商场。她开始四处寻找商场经理普罗克斯先生。我要补付糖果钱,任何收银员都能轻松处理,她何必要麻烦像普罗克斯先生这样重要的人呢?

妈妈一发现普罗克斯先生并且让他把注意力完全转移到我们身上后,她就用三个过道以外都能听得见的大嗓门说道:“告诉普罗克斯先生你的所作所为!”

我认识普罗克斯先生。我喜欢他。但是那天他完全领会了妈妈的意图。毋庸置疑,我在受审,而普罗克斯先生就是法官和陪审团!我流着眼泪承认了之前所做的一切并道了歉。妈妈把25美分放到我手里,让我交给普罗克斯先生。他听着我的讲述,接受了我的道歉,收下了那25美分。然后,他向我提出严厉警告,告诉我如果再犯后果将会如何。我抽噎着,尴尬不已,羞愧难当,完全意识到了自己行为的严重性,也知道了如果没有将它扼杀在萌芽中最终会导致什么结果——今天偷糖小贼,明天窃车大盗。

直到今天,通常当我站在糖果架附近的付款通道时,我还是会想起妈妈给我上的这一课。谢谢你,妈妈,是你让我远离了犯罪的道路。(译 / 刘克)

Off the Shelf

When I was ten years old, I lived with my family in a small ranch housein rural South Jersey. I often accompanied my mother to the A&Pto buy groceries. We did not have a car, so we walked, and I would help her carry the bags.

My mother had to shop very carefully, as my father was on strike. She was a waitress, and her salary and tips barely sustained us. One day, while she was weighing prices, a promotionaldisplay for the World Book Encyclopedia caught my eye. The volumes were cream-colored, with forest-green spinesstamped in gold. Volume I was ninety-nine cents with a ten-dollar purchase.

All I could think of, as we combed the aisles for creamed corn, dry milk, cans of Spam, and shreddedwheat, was the book, which I longed for with all my being. I stood at the register with my mother, holding my breath as the cashier rang upthe items. It came to over eleven dollars. My mother produced a five, some singles, and a handful of change. As she was counting out the money, I somehow found the courage to ask for the encyclopedia. "Could we get one?" I said, showing her the display. "It's only ninety-nine cents."

I did not understand my mother's increasing anxiety; she did not have enough change and had to sacrifice a large can of peas to pay the amount. "Not now, Patricia," she said sternly. "Today is not a good day." I packed the groceries and followed her home, crestfallen.

The next Saturday, my mother gave me a dollar and sent me to the A&P alone. Two quarts of milk and a loaf of bread—that's what a dollar bought in 1957. I went straight to the World Book display. There was only one first volume left, which I placed in my cart. I didn't need a cart, but took one so I could read as I went up and down the aisles. A lot of time went by, but I had little concept of time, a fact that often got me in trouble. I knew I had to leave, but I couldn't bear to part with the book. Impulsively I put it inside my shirt and zipped upmy plaidwindbreaker. I was a tall, skinny kid, and I'm certain the shape of the book was obvious.

I strolledthe aisles for several more minutes, then went through the checkout, paid my dollar, swiftly bagged the three items, and headed home with my heart pounding.

Suddenly I felt a heavy tap on my shoulder and turned to find the biggest man I had ever seen. He was the store detective, and he asked me to hand it over. I just stood in silence. "We know you stole something—you will have to be searched." Horrified, I slid the heavy book out from the bottom of my shirt.

He looked at it quizzically. "This is what you stole, an encyclopedia?"

"Yes," I whispered, trembling.

"Why didn't you ask your parents?"

"I did," I said, "but they didn't have the money."

"Do you know it's wrong?"

"Yes."

"Do you go to church?"

"Yes, twice a week."

"Well, you're going to have to tell your parents what you did."

"No, please."

"Then I will do it. What's the address?" I was silent.

"Well, I'll have to walk you home."

"No, please, I will tell them."

"Do you swear?"

"Yes, yes, sir."

My mother was worried when I arrived home. "Where were you? I needed the bread for your father's sandwiches. I told you to come right home."

And suddenly everything went green, like right before a tornado. My ears were ringing, I felt dizzy, and I threw up.

My mother tended to me immediately, as she always did. She had me lie on the couch and got a cold towel for my head and sat by me with her anxious expression.

"What is it, Patricia?" she asked. "Did something bad happen?"

"Yes," I whispered. "I stole something." I told her about my lust for the book, my wrongdoing, and the big detective. My mother was a good mother, but she could be explosive, and I tensed, waiting for the barrageof verbal punishment, the sentencing that always seemed to outweigh the crime. But she said nothing. She told me that she would call the store and tell the detective I had confessed, and that I should sleep.

When I awoke, sometime later, the house was silent. My mother had taken my siblings to the field to play. I sat up and noticed a brown-paper bag with my name on it. I opened it and inside was the World Book Encyclopedia, Volume I.(By Patti Smith)

窃书记

我10岁的时候,和家人一起住在南泽西郊区一个低矮的小平房里。我经常陪妈妈到A&P超市去买日用品。我们没有车,所以都是走着去的,而我都会帮她拎袋子。

妈妈买东西必须精打细算,因为爸爸当时正在罢工。她是一个服务员,工资和小费加在一起也就勉强够维持我们的生活。一天,当她在超市里比较价格时,《世界百科全书》的促销展示吸引了我的注意。那是一套奶白色的书,暗绿色的书脊上面烫着金字。购物满10美元就可以用99美分买这套书的第一册。

当我们穿梭在超市货架通道之间寻找着奶油玉米、奶粉、斯帕姆午餐肉罐头和脆麦片条时,我满脑子想的都是那本书,一门心思就想得到它。我和妈妈站在收银台旁,我屏住呼吸,看着收银员输入那些东西的金额结账。总金额超过了11美元。妈妈拿出一张5美元、几张1美元和一把零钱。在她数钱的时候,我不知怎的鼓起了勇气问她要那本百科全书。“我们买一本行吗?”我一边说,一边指着那个促销展示让她看,“只要99美分。”

我当时并不理解妈妈渐增的焦虑不安——她带的零钱不够,不得不放弃一大罐豌豆才够付款。“现在不行,帕特里夏,”她厉声说道,“今天不行。”我把买的杂货都装进袋子里,垂头丧气地跟着她回了家。

接下来的那个周六,妈妈给了我1美元,派我独自去A&P超市买东西。我要买两夸脱牛奶和一长条面包,在1957年,1美元可以买到这些。我径直走到了《世界百科全书》的展台。第一册只剩下了一本,我把它放进了我的购物车。我并不需要购物车,但我却推了一个,因为这样我就能一边看书一边推着它在过道里走来走去。很长时间过去了,但我这个人向来没有什么时间观念——这经常让我惹上麻烦。我知道我得走了,但又实在舍不得放下那本书。于是我一时冲动,将那本书塞进了我的衬衫里面,然后拉上了我那件印有格子图案的防风夹克的拉链。那时的我长得又高又瘦,我敢肯定书的轮廓一定特别明显。

我在过道里又转悠了几分钟,然后走到收银台,付了1美元,迅速将三样东西装进袋子里,然后回家。我的心怦怦直跳。

突然,我觉得有人在我肩膀上重重拍了一下,我转过身去,发现是一个大个子男人,那是我见过的块头最大的人。他是那家超市的保安,他让我把东西交出来。我一声不吭地站在那儿。“我们知道你偷了东西,你得让我们搜身。”我吓坏了,把那本厚重的书从衬衣下摆处滑了出来。

他大惑不解地看着那本书。“这就是你偷的东西,一本百科全书?”“是的。”我小声回答,身体有点儿发抖。“为什么不让你的父母买给你呢?”“我问过,”我说,“但他们没有钱。”“你知道这是不对的吗?”“我知道。”“你去教堂做礼拜吗?”“是的,每周去两次。”“好吧,你得告诉你的父母你都做了什么。”“不要,求求你了。”“那我来告诉他们。你们家住哪儿?”我没回答。“好吧,那我就得送你回家了。”“不要,求你了,我会告诉他们的。”“你发誓?”“是的,是的,先生。”

当我到家的时候,妈妈急坏了。“你去哪儿了?我等着用面包给你爸爸做三明治呢。我告诉过你要直接回家的啊。”

突然,我感觉眼前的一切都变暗了,就好像龙卷风即将来临前一样。我的耳朵嗡嗡作响,我觉得头昏眼花,然后就吐了。

妈妈立刻开始照顾起我来,就像她经常做的那样。她让我躺在沙发上,拿了一条冷毛巾敷在我的额头上,然后一脸担心地坐在我身边。“怎么了,帕特里夏?”她问,“是不是发生了什么不好的事儿?”“是的,”我低声说,“我偷东西了。”我告诉了她我对那本书的渴望,我犯下的错,还有那个大个子保安的事儿。我妈妈是一个好妈妈,不过她脾气火爆,所以我很紧张,等着她大骂我一顿,等着接受那似乎总比所犯的错要重的惩罚。但她什么都没说。她告诉我她会给超市打电话,告诉那个保安我已经坦白了,然后让我好好睡一觉。

我睡了一段时间醒来后,发现屋子里静悄悄的。妈妈带我的兄弟姐妹们去院子里玩了。我坐起身来,看到了一个写着我名字的棕色纸袋。我打开袋子,里面正是那本《世界百科全书》第一册。(译 / 张玲)

The Shaved Eyebrows

It was evening and time for my little sister and me to take our showers and get ready for bed. As I passed the mirror in the bathroom, there it was—a wild hair right in the middle of my forehead, threatening to be the beginning of the third eyebrow. I went into the shower trying to think of a solution, and then I spotted a razor. I took it and started trying to shave off the savage hair.

Usually I would trust my mom's advice about what to do in this sort of situation, but this was just too complicated for her—or so I thought. Well, while I was shaving that hair off, the razor slipped, and I ended up shaving off half my eyebrow! Then I did what any girl would do in this situation—I tried to even them out. When I was finished, I looked in the mirror. It was a disaster! I tried to figure out if there was any way to fix this mess. Thankfully, I found a way to hide my mistake. I put my bangsover my eyebrows. It worked perfectly!

Just then my parents called me to come and say good night. Nobody noticed my eyebrows, but they did notice my little sister's eyebrows! It turned out that while I was fighting the stray hair, she had found another razor in the drawer and began copying me. Now her eyebrows were completely missing! My parents were very confused until they finally noticed that half my eyebrows were gone as well. After a lot of questioning, I broke downand confessed to what had happened.

I thought that my parents would be mad at me until my mom took me aside to tell me that when she was a preteen, she had done a similar thing. In her case, it was her underarms. While away at camp on a swimming day, she was extremely embarrassed because she had some long hairs in her armpits. My grandma, her mom, had told her she was too young to shave yet. But she went against her mom's wishes and borrowed her friend's razor and shaved her armpits. Then she wrote her mom a confession letter telling her that she had done a terrible thing and that she was very sorry. At the very end of this long two-page letter, she finally told her mom what she had done. As my grandma read through the letter, she was so worried about this terrible thing that her daughter had done that by the end of the letter she laughed, because she was just so relievedto find out about what had actually happened. My grandmother totally understood how my mom had felt, just like my mom now understood me.

This ended up bringing my mom and me even closer together. I still wouldn't ever recommend trying to shave your eyebrows. I suggest that you find a different way to get closer to your mom!

As for my little sister, it took a long time for her eyebrows to grow back in. From then on, I've learned to be a better example to her because she still copies everything I do!(By Ariel Subrahmanyam)

眉毛刮掉以后

某一天晚上,我和妹妹是时间去洗个澡,准备上床睡觉了。当我从浴室的镜子前走过时,我看到了它——我前额正中间的那绺乱发,似乎要长成我的第三条眉毛了。我一边洗澡,一边努力想着解决办法,然后我看见了剃刀。我拿起它,开始试着把那绺乱发剃掉。

通常,我都会听从妈妈关于如何处理这类问题的建议,但这个问题对她来说太复杂了——或者我是这样认为的。然而就在我剃那绺头发的时候,剃刀一滑,结果我的半条眉毛被剃掉了!然后,我做了任何一个女孩在这种情况下都会做的事——我试图将两边的眉毛修成一样的。弄完后,我照了照镜子,却发现惨不忍睹!我努力想找个法子搞定这一团糟。谢天谢地,我找到了一个办法来掩饰这个失误。我用前额的刘海遮住了眉毛。效果好极了!

就在那时,父母喊我去和他们道晚安。谁都没有注意到我的眉毛,但他们却都注意到了妹妹的眉毛!原来,就在我处理那绺散乱的头发时,妹妹在抽屉里又找了把剃刀,开始照着我的样子做。现在,她的眉毛完全没了!父母非常困惑,直到他们最终发现我的一半眉毛也不见了。经过一番追问,我哭了,坦承了发生的一切。

我以为父母会生我的气,但妈妈却把我带到一边,告诉我她在十一二岁时也做过类似的事情。只不过她那次是发生在腋下。在外出露营游泳的时候,她觉得非常难为情,因为她的腋毛太长了。她的妈妈,也就是我的外婆曾告诉过她,她还没到该刮腋毛的年龄。但她违背外婆的意愿,借了朋友的一把剃刀,把自己的腋毛刮掉了。然后,她给外婆写了一封忏悔信,说自己做了一件很可怕的事,感到非常抱歉。在那封长达两页的信的末尾,她才最终告诉外婆自己做了什么。外婆读那封信时,一直在担心自己女儿所做的那件可怕的事情,但读到信的结尾时,她笑了。因为她终于知道到底发生了什么,长长地松了一口气。外婆完全理解妈妈那时的感受,就像妈妈现在理解我一样。

这件事让我和妈妈变得更亲密了。我仍然无论何时都不会赞成你试着刮掉自己的眉毛。建议你另找一个方法来拉近你和妈妈之间的距离!

至于我的小妹妹,过了很长一段时间她的眉毛才长回原样。从那时起,我学会了为她树立一个更好的榜样,因为她仍然会模仿我做的一切!(译 / 朱孝萍)

Oh, to Be Rich with Mom's Cake!

I lay on my bed, legs propped upagainst the wall, desperately wishing my mother would call. But I remembered the last time I'd seen her, right before the train for Providence pulled outof the station, "You know how expensive it is to call," she said, then squeezed me tight and said good-bye.

This was my first birthday away from home. I missed my mom, missed my sister, and most certainly missed the special pound cakemy mother always made for my birthday. Since getting to college that year, I would watch jealously as the other freshmen received care packages from their parents on their birthdays—and even on ordinary days. Big boxes containing summer slacksand blouses, packages of M&M's and Snickers, things they needed and things they didn't. Instead of feeling thrilled about my upcoming eighteenth birthday, I felt empty. I wished my mom would send me something, too, but I knew that she couldn't afford presents or the postage. She had done her best with my sister and me—raising us by herself. The simple truth was there just was never enough money.

But that didn't stop her from filling us with dreams. "You can be anything you want to be," she would tell us. "Politicians, dancers, writers—you just have to work for it; you have to get an education."

For a long time, because of my mother's resourcefulness, I didn't realize that we were poor. She did so much with so little. She owned and took care of our house. She clothed and fed us. She found ways to get us scholarships so that we could take violin, piano and violalessons from some of the best teachers in Philadelphia. She never

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